Daily Emerald Corrections Page

Though we at the Daily Emerald try to make sure every story is thoroughly fact-checked before it runs in print or online, sometimes we make mistakes. On this page, you can see all the corrections made to Daily Emerald stories since September 2019. The page is updated on a regular basis. 

If you would like to submit a correction, fill out the corrections form, email corrections@dailyemerald.com or call our office at (541) 346-5511.

2019-20 Academic Year

A news story published online on March 12 was updated to reflect the correct spelling of sisters Carla and Laura Gonzalez Pineda's last name. 

An arts and culture story published online on March 3 incorrectly stated that 50% of the proceeds from CatVideoFest, hosted by the Bijou Art Cinemas, would go to charity. All proceeds will go to charity. 

A news story published online on March 2 incorrectly characterized the Ballmer Group as a nonprofit. It is a philanthropic organization.

A news story published online on March 1 incorrectly stated the full name of the CDC due to an editing error. 

A news story published online on Feb. 28 misspelled Colombia. 

A news story published online and in print on Feb. 24 misspelled SOJC student Kelly Gehlen's last name.

An arts & culture story published online on Feb. 18 incorrectly referred to the country of Ethiopia as "Indiopia." 

A news story published online on Feb. 14 about guilty pleas made in the murder of Alex Oyombe Gradin was updated to correct the sequence of events leading to Gradin's murder to clarify that he was in no way associated with with gang violence or the individuals who pleaded guilty. It was also updated to reflect that the correct the minimum sentence of manslaughter is 75 months. Finally, it was also updated to correct a mis-quote from Lane County District Attorney’s senior prosecutor Jay D. Hall and a reference to the last name of one of individuals who pleaded guilty.

The caption for a photo in an arts and culture story published in print and online on Feb. 10 incorrectly identified one of the actors in the play "Sons of the Prophet."

A news story published online on Feb. 11 incorrectly said that UO President Michael Schill received a $100 bonus when he received a $100,000 bonus. 

A news story published online on Feb. 4 incorrectly stated Jim Brooks was the associate vice president for student services and enrollment management. Jim Rawlins holds this title.

An opinion column published online and in print on Feb. 10 incorrectly stated that an event called "What's Up with Whiteness?" held in January was hosted by the Women's Center. It was hosted by the Deconstructing Whiteness Working Group.

A news story published online on Feb. 6 incorrectly stated the origins of the University of Oregon's Ombuds program as from the U.S. government. It also incorrectly stated that Ombudspersons investigate complaints, but in fact they only hear them.

A sports story that ran online on Feb. 1 misspelled the name of women's basketball player Taylor Chavez. 

A news story published online and in print on Jan. 27 misattributed courtesy photos that ran with the story to Laura Horton. The photos were taken and provided by Ricca Francis.

A news story published online on Jan. 28 incorrectly Emily Grasberger's last name.

A news story published online on Jan. 30 incorrectly stated that there were a total of 15,800 homeless people in Lane County, 2,558 of which were children. Those numbers reflect the total number of homeless people in Oregon, not Lane County specifically.

An arts and culture story published online on Jan. 29 incorrectly spelled Brussels sprout. 

A news story published online on Jan. 22 incorrectly stated that the Eugene Downtown Riverfront Park would be 16 acres. It will be four acres, with the entire development being 16 acres.

A news story published online and in print on Jan. 21 misspelled the student group Muxeres as "Mujeres." The group changed its name to "Muxeres" around two years ago.

A news story published online on Jan. 16 incorrectly stated that Rep. Peter DeFazio received at least $7,000 from the Jordan Cove LNP PAC between 2016 and 2017. This money was refunded and not accepted.

An opinion column published on May 11, 2019 incorrectly stated the home country of a student who was interviewed. The article was corrected on May 14, 2019, but an incorrect reference to the student's home country still remained in the copy. The article was corrected on Dec. 28, 2019.  

An opinion column posted online on Nov. 14 incorrectly wrote "extraction bill" instead of "extradition bill" and misspelled French President Emmanuel Macron's first name. 

A news story published online on Dec. 9 incorrectly spelled Camp Kesem's UO development coordinator's name.

A news story published online on Dec. 7 incorrectly stated in a headline that a Board of Trustees meeting that was to be held on Tuesday, Dec. 10 was to be held on Monday. 

The upcoming University of Oregon esports lounge in the EMU will be 1,200 square feet. A news story published online and in print on Nov. 25, 2019 incorrectly stated it would be 12,000 square feet.

The Love Food Not Waste program was started in November 2019 and changed to a food-only model in April 2019. A news story published online on Nov. 15 incorrectly stated the program began in April 2019.

news article titled “Schill addresses UO senate with state of the university” that appeared online and in print incorrectly on Nov. 18 said that UO President Michael Schill gave his annual State of the University address to the senate. Schill’s remarks to the senate were an update on the state of the university given at every senate meeting he attends, and not his annual state of the university address. 

The caption of a photo run with a news story published online on Nov. 6 incorrectly labeled University of Oregon student Adrienne Harrison as a different UO student, Megan Bertolone.

The an opinion column was published online on Nov. 5 with the headline "Stevens: This generation is nothing but apathetic," but the headline should have read, "Stevens: This generation is anything but apathetic."

The University of Oregon is the third-largest four-year university in Oregon, and receives the least state funding per person. A news story published online on Nov. 5 incorrectly stated it was the largest university in Oregon and received the least funding from the government.

A news story published online on Oct. 29 incorrectly called the Predator Defense the Predatory Defense.

A previous version of an arts and culture article about White Claw published online on Oct. 22 incorrectly stated that data came from International Wines and Spirits Record. The company's correct name is IWSR Drinks Market Analysis.

The leftist newspaper The Insurgent meets every Thursday at 7 p.m. A news story that appeared online on Oct. 25 incorrectly said the meetings are held on Tuesdays. 

The Central Lutheran Church will open as one of Eugene's nine Egan Warming Centers in November 2019. The caption of a photo for a news story that appeared online on Oct. 21 incorrectly stated the church was First Christian Church.

The Next Generation Storytelling project was created by the School of Journalism and Communication at the University of Oregon, but not in partnership with the Northwest Scholastic Press. A news story that appeared online and in the Oct. 2 print edition said the SOJC and Northwest Scholastic Press collaborated on the program.

Local Eugene celebrity Rick Dancer tapped a traditional cask of Weihenstephan at Bier Stein's Oktoberfest. An arts and culture story that appeared online and in the Oct. 1 print edition incorrectly said that Bier Stein's staff tapped the cask.

A news story about the LSAT going digital, published online and in the Sept. 23 print edition, misspelled The Law School Admissions Council VP Troy Lowry's last name as "Lawry."

Management offered SEIU a 2% cost of living adjustment for the first two years. An op-ed that appeared online and in the Sept. 23 print edition incorrectly said that management offered SEIU raises of 1% or less for each year of the union’s four-year contract.

The University of Oregon is a publicly funded university that receives federal funding and the protections of the First Amendment apply to those demonstrating on university property. An opinion column published on Sept. 12 incorrectly stated that the University of Oregon is private property and that “jurisdiction remains with the President and student body government as to what speech is allowed and not allowed on campus.” The column was corrected to reflect that fact and was updated to include information about the university’s demonstration guidelines and to clarify the author's argument about think tanks influencing campus speech policies. 

The Lundquist College of Business houses the Women in Business group and the Warsaw Sports Marketing club, but it does not house the Women in Sports Business club. An opinion column published on Sept. 4 incorrectly said that the college housed the Women in Sports Business club.