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Moss: The Trump-ire strikes… minorities



If you support Donald Trump, you by default don’t support minorities—otherwise known as our fellow Americans that aren’t white males—and I will prove it to you.

Donald Trump has continually demonized various minority groups in the U.S in order to create fear and insecurity against anyone who isn’t a white male. The point is to use these scare tactics as a means to have everyone huddle around him and to bring him to power because, as he puts it, he is the only one who can solve these problems. If you don’t believe me, let’s just look at what he has conjured up against American minorities.

In a campaign statement, Donald Trump said 25 percent of U.S. Muslims, “Agreed that violence against Americans here in the United States is justified as a part of the global jihad.” However, before we all start panicking and vow to keep all Muslims out of the country, let me just say that he is factually incorrect.

He decided to say something that he hoped would fit his agenda and no one would fact check him. In reality, the data Trump used against Muslims was from an extremely controversial study by Center for Security Policy that, according to one official who works for this organization, was not meant to represent the American Muslim population. Also, for the sake of conversation, what would the impact of his quote have on the Muslims that serve in the military and put their life on the line for us?

If you still support Donald Trump, it is clear that you—by default—don’t really care for non-white Americans who are deeply impacted by his purposeful scapegoating that has won him a crowd.

On another dark note, Donald Trump doesn’t just stop the Bigot bandwagon for Muslims. One of his other hobbies is spreading false facts that severely impact Mexicans. Trump famously said, “The Mexican government forces many bad people into our country.” To cut this short, there is no evidence that Mexico sends “bad people” into the country.

Another quote adds, “Hundreds of thousands of (illegal immigrants are) going to state and federal penitentiaries.” Yet again, Trump’s statement is incorrect; it is a fact that Trump is blatantly wrong about the majority of Mexicans entering into the U.S.

Last but certainly not least, Trump does not seem to be a fan of the Black community either. According to Trump, crime statistics show blacks kill 81% of white homicide victims. If you don’t see a pattern here I’ll be blunt: this is false. According to the FBI in their 2014 report, the percentage of whites killed by blacks was 15%, as opposed to 81%.

It’s okay Trump, you only maintained an error factor of 5.4 times larger than the truth. In a time as racially charged as this, you almost have to wonder what group he was trying to appeal to by posting wrong statistics about black crimes.

As a whole, Trump does not seem to even be a slight fan of being factually correct. Why does he keep spitting false facts into the air that end up hurting American minorities? He wants to make us afraid. Trump wants us to fear the “other” as we rally around him for protection.

If I had a dollar for every time Trump used a minority as a scapegoat for power, I’d have enough to buy his “self-financed campaign”— which is not self-financed. If you still support Donald Trump, it is clear that you—by default—don’t really care for non-white Americans who are deeply impacted by his purposeful scapegoating that has won him a crowd.

You do not listen to facts; you are living in a wall of ignorance so big that Trump would put it on a border to keep non-white people out. However, there is another option, maybe Trump supporters know exactly what his intentions are, but they don’t care because they are, in fact, bigots.

My recommendation is to listen to the facts because they point to the truth, and the truth is that Trump is not our savior.


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Zachary Moss

Zachary Moss