HousingSpecial Sections

Moving out: Where to dump your junk



When you were preparing to move into your current dorm, apartment or house, everything fit like a glove into your four-door Honda Accord. A couple of trips back and forth to the car and you were ready to start your next year of college.

Now, the time has come to pull out the boxes and move out. Somehow, you have twice as much as you did nine months ago, and it seems impossible that it’s all going make its way back home.

The accumulation of items — found, bought or taken in — is a habit no one can escape. But before you start pulling out your hair, consider weeding out some of your possessions early and even put some money back in your wallet by exchanging, selling or donating locally.

Buffalo Exchange

If you would like to make a little extra money for clothes you no longer wear but are in good condition, consider Buffalo Exchange. If Buffalo Exchange buys your clothes, you can walk away with 35 percent of the sale price, in cash. However, if you decide to trade for something in the store, they give you 50 percent of the sale price as store credit. This unique thrift store is a great way to thin out your closet and give someone else the chance to reuse your style.

University junior Kate Emberley starts her process of thinning out her closet at Buffalo Exchange. @@http://directory.uoregon.edu/telecom/directory.jsp?p=findpeople%2Ffind_results&m=student&d=person&b=name&[email protected]@

“I go through my clothes about once a year,” Emberley said. “I like Buffalo Exchange because when I donate my clothes, I can get new clothes and I always feel better about buying used clothes.”

Thrift stores

If there are leftovers, which there usually are, Emberley walks around the corner to donate them to St. Vincent de Paul.

Donating to thrifts stores like St. Vincent de Paul and Goodwill is an easy way to help someone in need. Both of these stores have donation trailers around Eugene. The closest donation centers to campus are on 555 High St. and 435 E Broadway.

Charlie Harvey, assistant director of St. Vincent de Paul, said they generally take anything.

“Our main goal is to keep stuff out of the landfills,” he said.

Both St. Vincent De Paul and Goodwill will also come collect your stuff if you don’t have a truck. Generally, they haul furniture but are willing to pick up other household goods, too. Saint Vincent de Paul will send a truck and two men out for only $15 to haul your stuff away.

Craigslist

If you want to get rid of items that seem too nice to donate, posting an ad on Craigslist is another great way to sell your stuff.

University junior Kate Burke has sold three things on [email protected]@http://directory.uoregon.edu/telecom/directory.jsp?p=findpeople%2Ffind_results&m=student&d=person&b=name&[email protected]@ When she posted her first ad she expected to have to wait at least a couple days before seeing her desk roll off to its next owner. Surprisingly, she ended up selling it the same day and has turned to Craigslist ever since.

“Craigslist is quick and easy,” Burke said. “On campus there are so many students looking to buy inexpensively. And you don’t have to haul anything.”

Although the dumpster may be a quick fix for getting rid of your stuff, there are many other options. Starting now with a Craigslist ad or a quick trip to Saint Vincent de Paul could be the ticket to a care-free and enjoyable move out.


Do you appreciate independent student journalism? Emerald Media Group is a non-profit organization. Please consider a donation to support our mission.

Donate


Comments

Tell us what you think:


Daily Emerald

Daily Emerald