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Things to do this week: April 20-26: Let’s Talk Food, Duck baseball, Record Store Day, Ira Glass, Quack Chats



Thursday, April 20: Let’s Talk Food: Conversations with Oregon food writers at the Museum of Natural and Cultural History (1680 E. 15th Ave.), 5:30 p.m., $5-10

If you’re a foodie who holds a genuine interest for where your food is sourced, join the Museum of Natural and Cultural History this Thursday for an installation of its new series, Let’s Talk Food. The series is designed to discuss and explore Oregon’s bountiful food resources, from large corporations to local farms and community efforts, such as Eugene’s Farmers Market. On Thursday, Oregon food writer Kristy Athens will be addressing the idea of good food vs. bad food. Learn why the smaller, local efforts are on the rise and begin to understand how this might affect your food lifestyle.

For more information and to follow the lecture series, visit the museum’s website.

-Carleigh Oeth

Friday, April 21: Oregon Baseball vs. Stanford at PK Park (2760 Martin Luther King Blvd.), 6 p.m., free for UO students with ID

The forecast this Friday? Sunny with a side of baseball. Head down to PK Park as the Ducks take on Stanford in the first of a three-game series. Admittance is free for all UO students who present their student IDs at the gate. Duck fans who attend will get to see the team’s star pitcher David Peterson make his 10th start against a Stanford team that lost two of three games to UCLA last weekend. The Ducks are just one game ahead of the Cardinal for sixth place in the Pac-12, so this weekend’s series will be pivotal in determining the final standings. 

— Franklin Lewis

Saturday, April 22: 10th Annual Record Store Day at House of Records (258 E. 13th Ave.), 10 a.m., and Skip’s Records and CD World (3215 W 11th Ave.), 8 a.m.

Saturday marks the 10th Annual Record Store Day, a worldwide celebration of independent record stores. Three Eugene-area shops, Skip’s Records and CD World, House of Records and CD/Game Exchange, are participating with deals, Record Store Day special releases and other fun perks for those who show up early. Record Store Day releases can sell fast, so if you are looking to get your hands on a specific record, claim your place in line early. House of Records opens at 10 a.m. on Saturday, while CD World opens at 8 a.m. CD/Game Exchange opens at 11 a.m.

For those looking for more information on Record Store Day in general, check out: www.recordstoreday.com. For local happenings, call House of Records at 541-342-7975 or CD World at 541-683-6902. CD/Game Exchange can be reached at 541-302-3045. 

— Sararosa Davies

Saturday, April 22: Reinventing Radio: An Evening with Ira Glass at Hult Center for Performing Arts (7th and Willamette), 8 p.m., $35-85

Ira Glass is the creator of “This American Life,” the iconic radio show and podcast which has been the seed for other renowned podcasts, such as “Serial.” “This American Life” dives deep into the stories of the American people, poetically tying them together with an underlying theme and capturing a sense of commonality. Glass is touring the country and will be stopping in Eugene for a live storytelling event — but instead of telling other people’s stories, Glass will be speaking about his own life experiences, passions and career. Learn more about the voice behind “This American Life.”

For more information or tickets, visit the Hult Center’s website or call the ticket office at 541-682-5000.

— Carleigh Oeth

Wednesday, April 26: Quack Chats: Decision Making in a Dangerous World at Falling Sky Pizzeria and Public House (EMU), 6 p.m.

Best-selling author Michael Lewis explains in his new book, “The Undoing Project,” how research done by Israeli psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky changed our perspective about decision making. The two psychologists spent a year researching in Eugene. Head to Falling Sky to hear stories from UO psychology professor Paul Slovic about their research completed from 1971-1972. Slovic will discuss their influence on the behavioral economics field and how their work relates to threats happening to people and their environment in today’s world.

More information can be found on the UO event calendar.

-Kara Thompson

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Carleigh Oeth

Carleigh Oeth